Daily Archives: April 18, 2016

Trying IV

All of these words to say–sometimes trying isn’t enough.  Not to say that you shouldn’t try as hard as you can to reach your goals and use every ability you have to its fullest.  But sometimes it’s just not going to be enough.  That’s why we have doctors, meds, and other people to help when we get overwhelmed.

I’ve been in regular counseling now for over ten years and still have things I am learning about myself and how I tick and how I react to the various events in my past that still impact my present.  Get help when you need it for as long as you need it.  Learn to live with yourself and love yourself.   We can’t love others properly until we learn to love ourselves properly as well.   And know who can do the greatest works through you–the Lord Jesus.

I am still trying–but with a realistic view of myself.  I am going to fail at times. I’m going to be rejected.  I’m going to have difficulties.  That’s just the way life is, with or without bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder simply complicates my life more than other people’s.  But with good doctors, good counseling, good help, and good medication, I have had a much less complex  treatment course than others I know.

That’s my message to all who suffer from this disease.  Get help, as much as you can, to stifle the effects and make sure you take care of yourself.


Trying IV

All of these words to say–sometimes trying isn’t enough.  Not to say that you shouldn’t try as hard as you can to reach your goals and use every ability you have to its fullest.  But sometimes it’s just not going to be enough.  That’s why we have doctors, meds, and other people to help when we get overwhelmed.

I’ve been in regular counseling now for over ten years and still have things I am learning about myself and how I tick and how I react to the various events in my past that still impact my present.  Get help when you need it for as long as you need it.  Learn to live with yourself and love yourself.   We can’t love others properly until we learn to love ourselves properly as well.   And know who can do the greatest works through you–the Lord Jesus.

I am still trying–but with a realistic view of myself.  I am going to fail at times. I’m going to be rejected.  I’m going to have difficulties.  That’s just the way life is, with or without bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder simply complicates my life more than other people’s.  But with good doctors, good counseling, good help, and good medication, I have had a much less complex  treatment course than others I know.

That’s my message to all who suffer from this disease.  Get help, as much as you can, to stifle the effects and make sure you take care of yourself.


Introducing Yours Truly, a Huff Post Blogger!

I sent my poem to Arianna Huffington on April 7th, asking if she would consider printing it. Then promptly forgot about it. On the 10th, I got a reply in which she said she would love to feature my…

Source: Introducing Yours Truly, a Huff Post Blogger!


Turning Over A New Page!

Please check out my new “Services” page describing just some of the things I am offering as I move ahead with my writing. I will also soon be outlining some of my work trying to put a stop to the … Continue reading

WoodsWalk

... Oaks are like knotty grandfathers / caressing with harshgentle barkbeard cheeks, / looming like green mountains, / smelling of loam and bittersweet ...

Tough Timing, but then you know, Poetry

I'm glad it's Poetry Month, even if I can't devote as much time as I would like to. It's been a rough few weeks -- and I'm what the docs call an "under-reporter", so by that, please read: VERY hard.

Reblog – Welcome a new Dream Big Partner!

Originally posted on Dream Big, Dream Often:
I am please to welcome the latest blogger to become a Dream Big Partner: Being Lydia!! Be sure to check out Lydia’s page !! Here is an excerpt from her About Page: I…

Are we the Albert Alexander of mental illness?

(In which I am jealous of the possible mental health treatments available in the future)

I saw this thing on TV once about Albert Alexander who got an infection from a cut from a rose thorn, started to get better from manufactured penicillin, but then died from the infection because they could not manufacture enough penicillin in time.

It's a tragic story of someone who is terminally ill, received a successful experimental treatment, but the treatment couldn't fully cure him.
Since I've been reading mental health blogs recently (and blogging myself) I've really been thinking about mental health and its treatments.  As my mind often does, this strange comparison came to me.  Will some of us with bipolar be sort of like a mental health version of Albert Alexander?  Bear with me as this is a rather strained comparison... but I enjoy these kind of stretches.

First off it's not a trivial thing to think of fatality because as much as one in five of those with bipolar die from suicide.  In a sense we are all at risk and the clock is ticking on effective treatments vs. us ending our own lives.  They only tried penicillin on Albert Alexander because he had little chance of surviving.  We are maybe worse off because it seems unpredictable when depression or a mixed state will push us over the edge.  Personally I feel like being complacent is dangerous.  I don't feel like I am "past" suicide, despite multiple attempts.  I fear it always looms ahead of me as a tragic and real possibility.

The difficulty in replicating a treatment is not as dramatic these days of course.  By the time a drug is in a clinical trial, the company has figured out how to mass produce it.  However, there are arguably too many treatments already.  The brain is not as simple as an infection and treatment is not as simple as penicillin.  I might be missing out right now by not trying an available drug (e.g., Latuda which would cost me $900 a month).  Or what if that drug that totally will "fit" my brain is still in a clinical trial and I don't get it?  What if a revolutionary non-medication treatment comes out twenty years from now (something like TMS or ECT but totally "nails" the problem of bipolar in the brain)?  I will have been suffering (yes I don't think that's too strong a word) for those twenty years.

So while we are not exactly like Albert Alexander... there are millions of at the whims of the forces of research funding (and thus the economy), scientific interest, corporate profitability, and regulatory agencies.  We must hope there's some treatment already here that we can afford to try that will make a dramatic difference in our lives.  We must hope that an even better treatment will arrive soon.  We must hope.

Image credit: rose thorn


Are we the Albert Alexander of mental illness?

Mentions suicide but not with no specific recounting of a specific incident


I saw this thing on TV once about Albert Alexander who got an infection from a cut from a rose thorn, started to get better from manufactured penicillin, but then died from the infection because they could not manufacture enough penicillin in time.  It's a tragic story of someone who is terminally ill, received a successful experimental treatment, but the treatment couldn't fully cure him.

Since I've been reading mental health blogs recently (and blogging myself) I've really been thinking about mental health and its treatments.  As my mind often does, this strange comparison came to me.  Will some of us with bipolar be sort of like a mental health version of Albert Alexander?  Bear with me as this is a rather strained comparison... but I enjoy these kind of stretches.

First off it's not a trivial thing to think of fatality because as much as one in five of those with bipolar die from suicide.  In a sense we are all at risk and the clock is ticking on effective treatments vs. us ending our own lives.  They only tried penicillin on Albert Alexander because he had little chance of surviving.  We are maybe worse off because it seems unpredictable when depression or a mixed state will push us over the edge.  Personally I feel like being complacent is dangerous.  I don't feel like I am "past" suicide, despite multiple attempts.  I fear it always looms ahead of me as a tragic and real possibility.

The difficulty in replicating a treatment is not as dramatic these days of course.  By the time a drug is in a clinical trial, the company has figured out how to mass produce it.  However, there are arguably too many treatments already.  The brain is not as simple as an infection and treatment is not as simple as penicillin.  I might be missing out right now by not trying an available drug (e.g., Latuda which would cost me $900 a month).  Or what if that drug that totally will "fit" my brain is still in a clinical trial and I don't get it?  What if a revolutionary non-medication treatment comes out twenty years from now (something like TMS or ECT but totally "nails" the problem of bipolar in the brain)?  I will have been suffering (yes I don't think that's too strong a word) for those twenty years.

So while we are not exactly like Albert Alexander... there are millions of at the whims of the forces of research funding (and thus the economy), scientific interest, corporate profitability, and regulatory agencies.  We must hope there's some treatment already here that we can afford to try that will make a dramatic difference in our lives.  We must hope that an even better treatment will arrive soon.  We must hope.

Image credit: rose thorn


Weekly Wrap-Up April 18, 2016

Celebration In case you missed yesterday’s post. This blog is now officially 8 years old! It’s been a fun ride and I plan to keep going. Mood One week I’m struggling with mania and the next I’m dealing with depression. I started the week feeling down and by Wednesday that all changed. I’ll spare you […]

The post Weekly Wrap-Up April 18, 2016 appeared first on Insights From A Bipolar Bear.