Daily Archives: June 14, 2015

Antihistamine Decreases Schizophrenia Symptoms (!!!)

change in sx

This is major, in a study in Finland, (link below) giving 200 mg of an antihistamine called famotidine  to patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia reported decreased symptoms in a week and in a month had statistically significant decreases in their symptoms!

The drug penetrated the blood brain barrier and effectively blocked histamine from binding the H2 receptors, and this drug affected signaling molecules shown to be involved in schizophrenia.

If this works for all people with schizophrenia, it will be a godsend! Then the awful antipsychotic medications, with their awful, awful, side effects, may not have to be used, or may be used in reduced doses.

This may also work for people with bipolar d/o, when they are in a psychotic (out of touch with reality) phase.

This is so amazing! That something so mundane as an antihistamine can actually treat a complicated and awful disease such as schizophrenia! This shows the power of biological/medical research, how discoveries can change treatment of horrible diseases for the better and improve the quality of life of people who suffer from such diseases.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-07/uoh-ntf070113.php


the link ness monster

{SCHEDULED POST}

Are you sitting comfortably? Then let us begin with the strange and deranged, before moving on to things that make sense. Ahem…

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Small opiñioñata getting blown out of proportion.

Lark Voorhies on her mother’s claims that she is bipolar… n”It is a small, uh, opinionata that is getting blown thoroughly out of proportion. I have no stating reasons why anyone should worry about me. I mean, clearly I am a very strong, top-of-the-line, always-rising-to-it personage. And um, I have no worries myself, nor do I exude, exhibit or posses within my living strata…stratus any reason why someone should worry in my behalf. It’s just lies. It’s completely fictional,” she said. (Poor thing, she’s getting bashed globally, it’s not right.)

The Creatives

Music

Meg Hutchison: Seeing Stars (It’s folk music btw.)

“I think what you need to do is be honest in your writing. I don’t think you need to create more darkness than you have, and I don’t think you have to – if you do have bipolar or depression, I don’t think you have to fuel it in order to be a better writer. But I think you have to be honest in your work, and that’s what I’ve tried to do, is not ignore where it comes from and not ignore that somehow bipolar’s given me more emotional colors than I might have had otherwise. I like to think of it as a painter; that I have more colors on my palette because of these extreme highs and lows that I can now draw on as a writer. But I wouldn’t necessarily ask for that if I had the choice, you know.” An Interview with Meg Hutchinson on Music and living with Bipolar Disorder

Act0rs

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Woman, Interrupted: Lisa Nicole Carson Explains Her Bipolar Disorder and its Consequences

Christian Slater talks about his father… “Well, no. I haven’t seen him in a few years. We just spoke recently. He’s a manic-depressive schizophrenic. He’s always had trouble—he was a fantastic actor and extraordinarily charismatic and very, very good looking, but he had a really difficult time working with directors, collaborating with people. And that made his life very challenging. He’s in a place now, getting a lot of help from someone. We hadn’t spoken in about nine years, because I was in the middle of the relationship between my mother and my father, and I needed to get out of that. So I just sort of removed myself entirely from that equation to build my own life and take responsibility for myself. But in the last few months my father actually reached out to me and wanted to reconcile and reconnect. I was very grateful to be able to communicate with him. From a tumultuous, back-and-forth relationship, we were able to begin to build a better bridge for the both of us. So that was good.”

All the way back from 1994, but your perceptions might still be off. Contains traces of $cientology… Frances Farmer was undoubtedly a deeply troubled woman who suffered greatly in her life. The relatively primitive conditions of the state institution system, as well as the equally primitive therapies used in those days, no doubt exacerbated rather than helped her condition, as Frances herself stated more than once. However, sensationalizing and “fictionalizing” what this brave woman went through not only does a disservice to her memory, marginalizing her very real tribulations, it also prevents us from objectively understanding Frances’ trials in their proper historical context.
FRANCES FARMER: SHEDDING LIGHT ON SHADOWLAND – The Truth About Frances Farmer

Film

The Autobiographical Roots of ‘Infinitely Polar Bear’

Dark Horse wins top prize at Seattle Film Festival: The Dark Horse, a New Zealand film about a bipolar chess player, has nabbed two top gongs at the Seattle International Film Festival.

Gaming

PTSD caused by viking invasion… Anyone mind if I lol my ass off? *cites own c-ptsd in defence*
Ninja Theory has released the first gameplay trailer for its “independent AAA” game Hellblade, and revealed its key themes are mental health and psychosis.

And while we are on the subject of gaming, here are “games that do mental health right”. Please comment/analyse/throw breadrolls if you have opiñioñatas on this topic…

Info

Strategies for Bipolar Disorder When it All Becomes Overwhelming

Cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder.

Lights. Camera. Research: Launching the Bipolar Wellness Centre Video Series

Download mp3: THE ROLLERCOASTER JOURNEY WITH BIPOLAR MOOD DISORDER, Dr Antoinette Miric
Psychiatrist Akeso Specialised Psychiatric Clinics and patient (Anonymous). Classic FM South Africa

(Nope she ain’t my shrink.) I really love this next one, wish I’d found it long ago.

Talking to your doctor about bipolar disorder.

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(Australia) Mastering Bipolar Disorder, edited by Kerrie Eyers Gordon Parker: personal stories from sufferers of bipolar disorder reveal what it’s like on the inside. Their inspiring accounts and wise advice are accompanied by tips from psychiatrists for managing this difficult condition successfully.

And in Nature Neuroscience, researchers from DeCode Genetics and their colleagues report data linking genetic variants associated with risk of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to creativity. By analyzing genetic data from more than 150,000 Icelandic individuals, they found that these variants could be used to predict who in a separate population of 86,000 people were members of national artistic societies of actors, dancers, musicians, visual artists, and writers. The scientists also found that these same variants would predict whether individuals within separate groups of nearly 9,000 Swedes and more than 18,000 Dutch were employed in creative professions. This relationship in all groups could not be accounted for by differences in IQ, educational attainment, or how closely an individual was related to someone with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. GenomeWeb Anyone else keep reading ‘genome’ as ‘gnome’?

https://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKLRJ7JUx1JFAp6t0kyPgCCU7pd8sX9Ab

Opiñioñatas

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“Most manic depressives will tell you, and my Doctor agreed, that they love their manic highs. I loved Manic Carrie. That bitch got shit DONE. Like, with flair, creativity, humor, and speed. I could list for you scholarly papers as long as a donkey dong that established link between creativity and manic depression.”Rubber Chickens and Bipolar Disorder. Title of the year, methinks.

Why We Should Be Wary of the ‘Tortured Creative Genius’ Meme

“What about those with mental illness who work in retail or pull pints? Do these people not get a look-in?”
Having a mental illness doesn’t make you a genius – A new study links bipolar disorder with creativity, but it’s a mistake to glamorise debilitating conditions.

Plebs like us

Dustin Staggers: The restaurant machine keeps rolling. If you ask me, Dustin is hypomanic.

“When I was younger, all I was ever told was that I was worthless, and the only person who ever told me differently was my mom,” he said during a recent interview in his own apartment in Beverly Hills, a block away from his mother. “Doctors told me that I was going to spend the rest of my life in mental institutions.” Steven Greenberg

“Cameron’s psychosis most likely was not induced by his bipolar disorder. It was most likely trigger by his use of synthetic marijuana – or a combined impact of smoking spice and his mental illness.” Confessions Of A Synthetic Marijuana Smoker See also: marijuana worsens symptoms of bipolar disorder.

Fragile Minds: Hope People with severe mental illness struggle with the complexity of their disease and with a confusing system that doesn’t always help. (3rd in a 3 part series)

The whole world ain’t Caucasian

The Truth About Overcoming Mental Illness in the Black Community

Bipolar Disorder and the Uninvestigated Latino Population

News

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Hamptons rabbi blames expulsion on mail snafu, not affair (for everything else, there’s bipolar)

“It’s easier to find a switch in a dark room than it is to find a good head doctor,” said Karan, 39, who is manic depressive and has seen a number of counsellors over the years. “Anytime someone tells me, ‘A friend of mine was asking about a therapist’, I know they’re the one who needs someone. We know we’re not supposed to judge someone for being mentally disturbed, but we’re also so fixated on being totally sorted. You can’t let anyone know you’re messed up in the head.” India is less happy than Pakistan, Palestine, says World Happiness Report. What’s going on?

Argh argh arrrggghhh South Africa… Abuse of mentally ill patient: SAHRC must act. The SA Human Rights Commission has been called on to get involved in the alleged assault of a mentally ill teen by a doctor at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital. I wish that article was surprising.

Trigger: suicide

“Each time my son was allowed to go untreated for long periods of time, he sustained further brain damage. His downward course was aided by a completely ineffective legal system that continually protected his civil right to refuse treatment until he became suicidal or homicidal. This illness left him trapped in a body ravaged by irreversible damage from untreated bipolar disorder. Sadly, he was allowed to reach the crisis stage one time too many. His third attempt at suicide was successful.” A preventable suicide

Help Wanted

Vancouver: Do you have Bipolar Disorder and have problems with memory, concentration, or problem solving? The UBC Hospital Mood Disorders Centre is recruiting people with bipolar disorder to participate in a research study to assess if a new medication is helpful in improving memory and other cognitive problems.
You may be eligible to participate if you:
• Are between 19-65 years of age
• Have a diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder (Type 1) 
• Are clinically stable on current medication
• Not currently in a manic or depressed episode
This is a 6 week study. You will continue with current medication and no PLACEBO will be used. Compensation will be provided for your participation. For more information please call Jayasree: (604) 822-3769 E-mail: [email protected]

Fucked if I know why the image is microscopic…)

Long Island
http://longisland.craigslist.org/npo/5066111819.html

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Mid-June Check Up

june 2015

Hard to believe it is the middle of June, but here is the round-up of my activities from my template.

EXERCISE: I did 20 minutes one day. Yes, you should be laughing. I did, however, buy some hiking shoes. I hope I get some use out of them. We are planning a short walk tonight when the air gets cooler. I’d give myself an F here.

GETTING OUT OF THE HOUSE: I did this 11 days out of 14. This is a HUGE improvement. Just getting up, getting dressed, and having a shower every few days is pretty good for me. I’d give myself a B here.

WATER: I am not drinking enough specific water. I should be drinking at least 4 big glasses a day. I am doing more like two. My Jenny Craig gal says 72 ounces but gee, can you drink that much? I’d give myself a C here.

COOKING: I cooked or made arrangements for dinner every night this month. I may take this off the template. I think this is a habit now. I’d give myself an A here.

DEVOTIONAL: Eleven days out of 14 here. This is getting to be a habit…maybe another month on the template? I’ve earned a B here.

STAYING ON MY FOOD PLAN: Did this only one day out of 14. This plan may be unrealistic, but I need this many calories to lose one pound a week. I just need to quit cheating. I am tired of being fat. Definitely an F here.

SHOWERING: Have been showering every three days or so. If I don’t go out may go four days but that has not happened this month. Got my hair cut shorter so it is easier to manage. I think another two months or so on the template. I’d give myself a B on this.

I am a little worried about my overall appearance. I have been going with minimal make-up and hair style. I’m also fat. I don’t spend the time getting ready that others do. I’m not sure if I need to perk up my look or not. Part of me just doesn’t care.

NO CANCELLING/ RESCHEDULING: I cancelled a lot but I rescheduled everything. So I did get it done. But I cancelled a whopping 6 days out of 14. This is seriously ridiculous. I just wake up and panic and can’t go through with everything. And I need to stop scheduling more than one or two things per day. I just get too tired. I’d give myself a D on this.

FOLLOWERS: I set a goal of 1000 followers on the blog by the end of June. I am picking up about one per day. At this rate, I should have my 1000 at the end of July. After that, I figure I don’t much care how many followers I have. Not that I don’t welcome new people, but the numbers don’t matter too much. I’m okay on this goal.

WEIGHT: I weigh exactly what I weighed at the beginning of the month. This isn’t bad considering my best friend came over for a long weekend and I ate everything that didn’t move too fast. I wound up gaining 4 pounds but then losing 5. I’d give myself a D here, but it is HARD to diet on vacation. I still am shooting for losing a pound a week.

VISITING BLOGS: My goal is to visit 7 blogs per day. I just started this goal so we will see how it goes.

CHURCH AND SEEING FRIENDS: I’ve been to church twice and missed once because of being out of town. An A there. I’ve gotten together with three friends so far.

I have not been to my women’s church support group, but it is sparse in the summer. I will try to go when I am off vacation.

I’ve only checked my friend list once this month. I plan to do that today.

I did two activities my husband wanted to do that I did not: had dinner with his sister and went to a rock store.

I did get a massage.

I have not seen my therapist (who is now $60 a visit as she does not take Medicare) or my psychiatrist, but I have them both scheduled for June.

I had set a new goal this month of doing something alone with each of my three kids. I have tea scheduled with my daughter, but need to do something with each boy. That is a goal for June.

BTW, Danny has a 94 in his summer school biology class. We have had him type his notes each night and then we quiz him on them. He’s had 2 exams and three quizzes and has sailed through. I realize this is micro managing a college kid. However, I think it is showing him some good study habits. It is also giving him self confidence since that disastrous last semester.

Anyway, that is the update. Opinions welcome!

lily

Penny Farthing

The single most challenging test for an individual cyclist is the event known as The Hour. You can read an earlier edition on this topic here: https://puncturerepairkit.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/the-hour-of-lead/

The challenge is to cycle round a track for exactly 60 minutes and see what distance you can cover. It is as much a mental challenge as it is a physical feat of endurance.

The first recorded distance was set in 1873 by James Moore in Wolverhampton in England, riding an Ariel 49″ high wheel bicycle 14.5 miles.  On 7 June this year Bradley Wiggins rode  33.8808856 miles on a Pinarello Bolide HR, SRAM Cransket, modified front fork, custom printed  handlebars, 58/14 gear ratio – it’s a bicycle, apparently. Moore is pictured on the right here – note the stylish head gear – in sharp contrast to Wiggins’ aerodynamic ‘teardrop’ helmet.

Whose achievement is the greater?

This a question that lies beneath much of what we ‘recovery specialists’ engage with when supporting folks like ourselves with stubborn, bloody – minded mental health problems. There is the recurrent theme of loss; loss of emotional possessions such as personal relationships, or opportunities to use one’s skills, the loss of time itself that mental illness soaks up for days, weeks and years. The common thread can be summed up thus: loss of achievement. We started out with hopes and dreams. Someone, a teacher, a doctor, or maybe a disappointed parent, put those hopes and dreams away when our brains crumbled.

Back in 2005, when my psychiatrist agreed that I could start looking for work again after 3 years off sick, he made 3 provisos: 1) never work in London again (an hour plus journey); 2) only work part time; 3) I should not be in charge. And so, a part of my world expanded, part also shrank. I have kept to that advice …. mostly. I will never work in the Big City again. I can’t see me working full time (although the thought has crossed my mind in the last year or so.) But I ignored the part about being in charge with the first job I did after having agreed to these conditions. It wasn’t pretty. Eventually, in 2013, this time with my psychiatrist’s support, I found myself ‘in charge’ once more.

I can say with some confidence that I am a skilled group facilitator. I have years of experience supporting people one to one with enduring mental health problems to secure their recovery. If their warm feedback is anything to go by, I must be doing something right.

And yet.

I know that I cannot manage what I used to – I’ll never again take the 7.11 train to London 5 times a week. I know that. I am reminded of why by the emotional charge that almost blows me off my feet every time I arrive at the station in London en route to a training course amidst the teeming throng of humanity. I know that – for now – 3 days a week with a much shorter journey is the extent of my working week.

So, which is the greater feat? 14 miles on a Penny Farthing or nearly 34 miles on the latest technology cycling science and mechanics have to offer? The hour for each of these attempts had the same number of minutes and seconds, but they feel different to me. I am riding the Penny Farthing, and it’s enough for me to say that I’m still in the saddle.

The French call The Hour challenge Contre La Montre – Against the Clock.  There is still time…..

 

After great pain a formal feeling comes–
The nerves sit ceremonious like tombs;
The stiff Heart questions–was it He that bore?
And yesterday–or centuries before?

The feet, mechanical, go round
A wooden way
Of ground, or air, or ought,
Regardless grown,
A quartz contentment, like a stone.

This is the hour of lead
Remembered if outlived,
As freezing persons recollect the snow–
First chill, then stupor, then the letting go.

Emily Dickinson 1830-1886


Penny Farthing

The single most challenging test for an individual cyclist is the event known as The Hour. You can read an earlier edition on this topic here: https://puncturerepairkit.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/the-hour-of-lead/

The challenge is to cycle round a track for exactly 60 minutes and see what distance you can cover. It is as much a mental challenge as it is a physical feat of endurance.

The first recorded distance was set in 1873 by James Moore in Wolverhampton in England, riding an Ariel 49″ high wheel bicycle 14.5 miles.  On 7 June this year Bradley Wiggins rode  33.8808856 miles on a Pinarello Bolide HR, SRAM Cransket, modified front fork, custom printed  handlebars, 58/14 gear ratio – it’s a bicycle, apparently. Moore is pictured on the right here – note the stylish head gear – in sharp contrast to Wiggins’ aerodynamic ‘teardrop’ helmet.

Whose achievement is the greater?

This a question that lies beneath much of what we ‘recovery specialists’ engage with when supporting folks like ourselves with stubborn, bloody – minded mental health problems. There is the recurrent theme of loss; loss of emotional possessions such as personal relationships, or opportunities to use one’s skills, the loss of time itself that mental illness soaks up for days, weeks and years. The common thread can be summed up thus: loss of achievement. We started out with hopes and dreams. Someone, a teacher, a doctor, or maybe a disappointed parent, put those hopes and dreams away when our brains crumbled.

Back in 2005, when my psychiatrist agreed that I could start looking for work again after 3 years off sick, he made 3 provisos: 1) never work in London again (an hour plus journey); 2) only work part time; 3) I should not be in charge. And so, a part of my world expanded, part also shrank. I have kept to that advice …. mostly. I will never work in the Big City again. I can’t see me working full time (although the thought has crossed my mind in the last year or so.) But I ignored the part about being in charge with the first job I did after having agreed to these conditions. It wasn’t pretty. Eventually, in 2013, this time with my psychiatrist’s support, I found myself ‘in charge’ once more.

I can say with some confidence that I am a skilled group facilitator. I have years of experience supporting people one to one with enduring mental health problems to secure their recovery. If their warm feedback is anything to go by, I must be doing something right.

And yet.

I know that I cannot manage what I used to – I’ll never again take the 7.11 train to London 5 times a week. I know that. I am reminded of why by the emotional charge that almost blows me off my feet every time I arrive at the station in London en route to a training course amidst the teeming throng of humanity. I know that – for now – 3 days a week with a much shorter journey is the extent of my working week.

So, which is the greater feat? 14 miles on a Penny Farthing or nearly 34 miles on the latest technology cycling science and mechanics have to offer? The hour for each of these attempts had the same number of minutes and seconds, but they feel different to me. I am riding the Penny Farthing, and it’s enough for me to say that I’m still in the saddle.

The French call The Hour challenge Contre La Montre – Against the Clock.  There is still time…..

 

After great pain a formal feeling comes–
The nerves sit ceremonious like tombs;
The stiff Heart questions–was it He that bore?
And yesterday–or centuries before?

The feet, mechanical, go round
A wooden way
Of ground, or air, or ought,
Regardless grown,
A quartz contentment, like a stone.

This is the hour of lead
Remembered if outlived,
As freezing persons recollect the snow–
First chill, then stupor, then the letting go.

Emily Dickinson 1830-1886


So I Put My Resume Out There

I rewrote and reworded and applied a different format to my resume. I even used a font I hate because a friend who is an HR Director said he preferred it because it looked clean and was easy to read. It was a big pain because I wrote that resume when I was fresh out of […]

The Answer to Bullying

“Being bullied is not a harmless rite of passage or an inevitable part of growing up; it has serious long-term consequences,” says Stephen Luntz in an article, “Study Finds Bullying Affects Mental Health More Than Child Abuse” [http://www.iflscience.com/brain/price-bullying-measured].

Well, duh.

But wait. Look at that title again. “Bullying Affects Mental Health More Than Child Abuse“?

Yes. That’s an accurate headline, not just clickbait.

“Our results showed those who were bullied were more likely to suffer from mental health problems than those who were maltreated,” says Professor Dieter Wolke of the University of Warwick in the article. “Being both bullied and maltreated also increased the risk of overall mental health problems, anxiety and depression.”

He adds, “It is important for schools, health services and other agencies to work together to reduce bullying and the adverse effects related to it.”

Again, duh. Easier said than done.

And how big is the problem? A CBS News poll reports that most Americans reported being bullied at some point while growing up http://www.cbsnews.com/news/cbs-news-poll-majority-of-americans-were-bullied-as-kids/. Only 41 percent report never being bullied.

“Just” 10 percent said they were bullied “a lot.” That’s still a lot of children who are bullied a lot.

I know I was. And I’m willing to bet that many of you were too.

So what’s to be done?

Well, we know what doesn’t work.

Telling those who are bullied:
“They’re just joking.”
“Learn to take a little teasing.”
“You’re too sensitive.” (my personal favorite)
“Learn to fight back.”
“Get used to it.”
“Just ignore it.”
“What they say doesn’t matter.”
“Don’t let them see that they hurt you.”
“Laugh it off.”
“Handle it yourself.”
“Try to make friends with them.”
“Give them what they want and they’ll leave you alone.”
“Don’t give them what they want and they’ll stop.”
“Stay away from them.”
“Stand up to them.”
“Get your friends together when they’re around.”
“Tell your parents/teacher/principal.”
“Take karate lessons.”
“Avoid the second floor bathroom (or wherever).”
“Grow up.”

(If you have any other favorites, let us all know in the comments!)

Look again at that list. They are pieces of advice to the VICTIMS of bullying on HOW NOT TO BE BULLIED. What’s wrong with this picture?

Feminists and their allies have begun questioning the advice given to women on HOW NOT TO BE RAPED. Instead, they say, the focus should be on teaching men HOW NOT TO BE RAPISTS.

http://www.ifyouonlynews.com/feminist-issues/10-rape-prevention-tips-that-are-guaranteed-to-work-image/

And apparently, this approach is having some success.

http://freethoughtblogs.com/greta/2013/01/08/rape-prevention-aimed-at-rapists-does-work/

Of course, bullying is not rape; the analogy breaks down quickly. But both are about power and “the other” – asserting dominance over someone who is different.

In bullying, that difference can be real or merely perceived, and can be literally anything – weight, height, intelligence, socioeconomic level, race, ethnicity, popularity, clothing, sex, gender, hair color, disability, athletic prowess, speech, preference of superhero. The criteria for who is a victim seem completely arbitrary, because they are. The victim is the other, someone who is by definition different.

Is it fair, or even reasonable, to tell victims to alter whatever it is about themselves that makes them different? It can be soul-killing to have to pretend you are not smart, not poor, not gay, not Muslim. It can be impossible to pretend you’re not short, don’t have a disability, are good at sports. And why should victims have to, any more than women should never go out alone at night or never flirt?

We need to start teaching kids HOW NOT TO BE BULLIES, not how not to be bullied.

Some specifics, like this:
“If you think another kid is gay, ignore it.”
“If someone is not as popular as you, so what?”
“if a kid in your class dresses funny, don’t say anything.”
“If it’s not fun for everyone, stop.”

Or this:
“Don’t hit people because you don’t like the way they look.”
“Don’t joke about people who don’t enjoy it.”
“Don’t call people anything but what they want to be called.”
“If someone is unhappy, don’t make it worse.”

Or this:
“If someone is smarter or less smart than you, form a study group.”
“If someone has less money than you, do things that don’t cost money.”
“If someone is always dropping her books, help pick them up.”

I’m not an educator or a child psychologist – just a former smart, scrawny girl with weird hair and poor eyesight. In other words, bully-bait.

Maybe my ideas won’t work. But what we’re doing now sure doesn’t. That poll I mentioned earlier suggests that bullying is actually increasing, despite all the attention the topic is getting. Generalities like “All people deserve your respect” and “Celebrate differences” and “Be-kind-keep-your-hands-to-yourself-no-hazing-no-fighting-no-name-calling” aren’t getting the job done.

Bully culture is well and truly entrenched in our society. To change that, we need to change the culture – if for no other reason, to head off all those mental health problems waiting up ahead for bullied children.

Who’s with me?


Filed under: Mental Health Tagged: advice to victims of bullying, bullying, education, how not to be a bully, media and mental illness, mental health, mental illness, preventing bullying, schools, stopping bullying

Home Again, Home Again, Jiggety-Jog

I’ve actually been home since Thursday, but I’ve been too wiped out to do much of anything except sleep. The surgery went well—they got the whole kidney stone out and I’m already healing from the surgical wound in my lower back. My pain is under good control, I’m eating a little, and I’ve been taking in lots of fluids (even though everything tastes metallic due to this antibiotic I’m on. Bleah). I’m just tired and weak, and of course I’m mad at my body for acting like it’s 90 years old. I feel like I should be up and at ’em, and I’m just not there yet.

But surgery does take a lot out of a person, and I can’t expect to snap back as quickly as I did when I was young. I just hate feeling so sluggish that it’s a Herculean effort just to go to the breakfast table. So on that note, I’ll wrap up this post because I’ve been up for over 2 hours and my bed is calling my name again. I’ll be back when I’ve got more energy. :-)


Stop the Stigma